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Diary of Andrés Fava

by

Translated from by

Published: May 2005

$14.00 $11.20

ISBN: 9780974968063
    Paperback

This unpredictable collection of reflections is peppered with quotes from French poets and American jazzmen. Bemused and melancholy, erudite and searching, this first-time English translation of Diario de Andrés Fava is full of autobiographical winks at the reader. Cortázar’s brilliance and irreverence are in full flower.

Anyone who doesn’t read Cortázar is doomed.
— Pablo Neruda

 

Cortázar is a unique storyteller. He can induce the kind of chilling unease that strikes like a sound in the night.
— Time Magazine

Book Description

Andrés Fava is a character from Cortázar’s Final Exam, and his diary originally formed part of that novel, written in 1950 but not published (for political reasons) until after the author’s death. At some point, Cortázar decided Fava’s diary should stand on its own as an independent work.

While Final Exam is mostly dialogue, Diary of Andrés Fava is all reflection: on his reading, dreams, conversations and writing. This unpredictable collection is peppered with quotes from French poets and American jazzmen. Bemused and melancholy, erudite and searching, this first-time English translation of Diario de Andrés Fava is full of autobiographical winks at the reader. Cortázar’s brilliance and irreverence are in full flower.

Anyone who doesn't read Cortázar is doomed. Not to read him is a serious invisible disease which in time can have terrible consequences. Something similar to a man who has never tasted peaches. He would quietly become sadder. . . and, probably, little by little, he would lose his hair.

Pablo Neruda


Cortázar is a unique storyteller. He can induce the kind of chilling unease that strikes like a sound in the night.

Time Magazine


This beautiful amalgam of 'marvelous instances' tilts against the 'airy blades' of empty thought with vengeance. Equal parts tender wit, elegant aside and acid observation, Diary of Andrés Fava, which comes to us from the desk of one of the 20th century's greatest literary explorers, is 100 percent delight.

Laird Hunt


An interview with translator Anne McLean by Jessa Crispin of Bookslut

Read a piece (en español) on Julio Cortázar on Pagina/12.